A blog that explores Australian houses. If you love architecture, design, interiors and interesting buildings of all types, The House Hunter is for you.
Tag Archives: Sydney

14 Wolaroi Crescent, Tamarama

 

I don’t usually use a non-house shot as the lead but I mean…c’mon. It’s a helluva view. This place is on a particularly private little street in Tamarama, perched above the beach with jaw-dropping views from each level. And there be a number of levels.

 

Tamarama, as I’m sure you know, is one of Sydney’s most highly sought after beaches. It’s a jewel in the east’s crown. It and Bronte, which is right next door. As an aside, something I noticed when I was there to photograph this house is there is a disproportionately high amount of very attractive men there on Saturday mornings. I feel like that’s important to note.

 

 

It’s a classic ‘Sydney eastern beaches’ beach house, by which I mean it’s big, built to capitalise on the views, and perfect to party in. Glamorous, is what I’m getting at (I’ve veered away from calling it Glamorama but…oops, there I go). It was rebuilt a decade ago and is now designed in a vertical fashion with wide open spaces and expanses of glass. The vistas are the focal point, and the architecture complements that. White features heavily, which is ideal in a place built for the sun and sand.

 

It feels like summer when you walk in, basically, and that appeals to me as I hate winter and am desperately waiting for its end. It’s also on the market. If you buy it, please invite me to the housewarming. I’ll bring cheap wine. My usual.

 

 

 

I love this bathroom. The exposed brick was covered in the rest of the house but kept in the main en suite, which gives it a bit of an edgy Brooklyn feel…yep, that's a thing.

 

 

 

2b Tarrant Avenue, Bellevue Hill

 

Ahh, Bellevue Hill, one of Sydney’s stomping grounds for the elite. One of the things they do there is buy up sexy pieces of real estate, which is where 2b Tarrant Avenue comes into the frame. It’s currently on the market for offers around $5m. Much to my chagrin, I just discovered that Title Deeds got to this one first, but they don’t seem to go into a hell of a lot of detail, so let me add some colour for you (not that I was ever particularly good at sticking within the lines).

 

If you don’t know much about Bellevue Hill, the Fin helpfully wrote up a suburb profile and didn’t hide it behind a paywall – free win! To summarise: approximately 5km east of the CBD; rich, rich, rich; non-waterfront; serious architectural cred; bastion of moneyed up business players (Lachlan Murdoch). Houses can fetch over $20m. If you have $20m, please get in contact with me via the ‘contact’ tab so I can provide you with my phone number.

 

 

The living room – above – is my favourite part of the house, particularly as it has city views, opens out onto the pool area and has a swanky bar – check, check, check. Another place that fulfils my house party fantasies. It’s sheer Art Deco goodness (especially the checkered flooring).

 

 

Someone with exquisite taste in both liquor and design owns this house. They can join my social circle any time. Perfect crisp white block colour with a mirrored background opening up the space and well-chosen cultured New Yorker prints amongst the bottles of Veuve. I managed to photograph it without getting my reflection in the shot, too, so let’s not discount my role in all this, ha!

 

 

At first I thought it was older, but I’m taking a punt and placing this stately home in the mid-century age range, which suits the profile of the suburb as well as the Art Deco features of the house. The owners have placed an emphasis on internal design, and I’m envious of the ubiquity of the views; you can see Sydney Tower (isn’t it called Centre Point? When did they change the name?) and Deutsche Bank Place from the dressing room. The dressing room. I’d be happy to have a dressing room, let alone a dressing room with city vistas.

 

 

One of the children’s single bedrooms has an en suite – my childhood dream. It also has an excellent, honeycomb-like window frame that I fell hard for.

 

 

And so we come to the main bedroom, with the famed dressing room and an epically large en suite. The main is well put together and perfectly positioned for the views.

 

 

 

 

It’s a good-sized family home with an extensive ground floor. And it has trimmings – serious trimmings. The library is my favourite of these. It might be fairly compact, but it’s a library, and I’ll be damned if I don’t want one just like it when I grow up and marry a director of a hedge fund.

 

 

I’ve run out of my amazingly witty and insightful comments, so I’ll leave you to gaze at the photos. You’ll probably find, like I did, that one of the best aspects of this home is the care that’s been taken to accessorise it and give it that ‘hidden gem’ feel; every room has something in it that pops and pulls you in.

 

 

Love this shot. So summery, even though we're stuck in the throes of winter.

110 Elizabeth Bay Road, Elizabeth Bay

 

Usually I prefer to write about places I hunt out myself, but sometimes one is sent to me that I really like. This is one of those times. It’s a block of apartments up for sale in one of my favourite suburbs (as I’ve noted before), Elizabeth Bay. It’s on the harbour, it’s curvy, it’s strata-titled…All wins.

 

It contains four two-storey apartments, which is pretty contemporary for a block built in the early ’70s, although it sounds like some remodelling may have occurred, and is listed on the Australian Institute of Architects’ register of Significant Architecture in NSW.

 

 

The piece I was sent said it’s being marketed at around the $30 million mark (which figures) by Stuart Cox of Savills, who said “I doubt that an entire block of apartments in this prime location will become available again in my lifetime” and described it as a “trophy asset”.

 

May I please have this view?

 

This little article provides some perspective on the construction. The tower-like build was precipitated by the narrowness of the block (unsurprising in the area). Every floor has harbour views, and there’s basement parking for up to 12 cars, a serious boon in an area in which I have personally driven around for an hour without finding anywhere legal to park my car. It’s been thoroughly updated (as the pictures demonstrate) - both in terms of the individual apartments and the common areas – so the primary question is what the purchaser will do with the block. It’s an intriguing proposition.

 

 

Various, Cremorne Point

I really hope that one day I become the kind of person who lives in a place like this.

 
Can you smell the sweet, sweet scent of prestige? That’s Cremorne Point for you. You know the people who traveled first class on the Titanic? The people who live at Cremorne Point are the modern-day equivalent of them. That sounds more dire than intended (I’m sure the suburb isn’t sinking). The point I’m trying to make is: woah wealth. The suburb is around 6km from the CBD and is smack bang on the harbour. It has a ferry wharf, making it even cooler. I couldn’t find anything more recent in my five minutes of research, but according to Property Observer Cremorne Point was the sixth most expensive apartment market in Sydney in 2012…just a random fact reaffirming my ‘this is an expensive suburb’ thesis.

 

 

I’ve been a bit slack lately and haven’t explored a house, but since I was in the area I thought I’d snap some pictures of the fairly amazing houses and apartment buildings dotted along the foreshore of this suburb. Hopefully that will tide you over.

 

 

The view isn’t bad, either. Incidentally, I think the shed in the above photo might be the same one that’s the subject of this article? Fun fact: I was eleven when that article was written. Half the age I am now. Ah, nostalgia.

 

 

Although this set of apartments comes from a later era than most of the places in the suburb, I really like the formation/symmetry/pattern.

 

Cremorne Point is also home to my favourite Sydney pool. It's right on the harbour. Perfection.

Joanna Lamb: 15 Colour Series

 

You may have noticed earlier that I’m not just keen on architecture – I am also keen on art about architecture. (That’s how far out and expansive my taste is.) This was probably made clear with one of my absolute favourite posts (seriously, I love it – you should definitely take a look because you’re pretty much guaranteed to like it), which featured Anna Carey’s photographs of the incredibly awesome house models she makes from her memories of Gold Coast beach shacks and hotels.

 

So I was excited when I found out about Joanna Lamb’s latest exhibition at Sullivan + Strumpf. It’s a series that focuses on interiors, juxtaposing them with vibrant colour. I did a brief Q&A with the Perth-based artist below.

 

I particularly love this piece.

 

How would you describe your latest exhibition at Sullivan + Strumpf?
My latest exhibition at Sullivan+Strumpf is a series of works that deal with domestic interiors and exteriors. There are a number of paintings, a series of 10 works made from lasercut laminex and a neon and aluminium piece. All the works use a restricted palette of the same fifteen colours.

 

What brought about your interest in incorporating representations of architecture into your art?

I have been painting urban and suburban imagery since I was at art school. I am drawn to its abstract qualities of form, space and colour. I was brought up in the suburbs of Perth. It’s where I live now so in that sense it is what I am able to comment on the most honestly.

 

How did you link the architectural concepts in your pieces with the vivid colour choices?

The colour choice was made first. The fifteen colours chosen were derived through an intuitive process in which I considered colour contrast and tonal value to most effectively suggest multiple spatial scenarios. Using these colours only I then manipulated different compositions until they made sense visually. The architectural imagery was used to show off the possibilities of using this set palette. I have often used some kind of system to direct my work.

 

What do you hope the audience takes away from the series?

It was important the works were seen together to understand the idea behind it. The works definitely work as separate objects but have more impact when viewed together. There is one particular work - an image of a pool painted directly onto the wall of the gallery - which, because of its size and lack of an edge, makes the viewer part of the piece. Maybe it’s a concept suburb; one which you might not want to live in permanently, but it’s an interesting place to visit.

 

Can you describe the process that goes into creating a piece?

Most pieces are based on photos I have taken of places I know or images found on real estate sites on the internet. I create initial drawings on the computer which can take anywhere from a couple of days to several weeks.

 

Are you working on any new projects at the moment?
I am working on several ideas at the moment which may form the basis of works for upcoming solo shows over the next year and a half.

 

Has your approach to art and design changed significantly since you started out in the industry?
My approach to art has changed significantly since I started out. The computer as a tool is now an integral part of my practice after coming to it quite reluctantly after studying graphic design. Also the influence of advertising and graphic design imagery and print and electronic media processes have infiltrated my work very significantly since working in the design industry.